Calvinistic and Charismatic – Do they Mix?

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There is a large and influential group who would be classed as Charismatic Calvinists (or reformed continuationists). There are many from this group who have been faithful in their proclamation of the gospel and have served as examples of Christian piety. For this I am thankful and grateful for what I continue to learn from them. However, the question I ask in this post is, can you be Calvinistic and Charismatic? I ask this question because there are those who preach that the reformed must be charismatic.

The Charismatic Calvinist is a novel combination that has come to most prominence in recent years. In fact, the majority of Calvinistic teachers in the history of the church have been cessationtionists (a cessationist believes that the miraculous gifts were limited to the early church).

What is Calvinism? Being a Calvinist goes beyond the embracing of the five points (TULIP – Total Depravity, Unconditional Election, Limited Atonement, Irresistible Grace and Perseverance of Grace). The five points are important (and Scriptural), but they are not all there is to Calvinism. Burk Parsons argues that Calvinism needs to be understood as a theology that

“begins with God, teaches us about God, and directs our hearts and minds back to God according to the way He deserves, demands, and delights in our worship of Him and our obedience to Him.”[1]

Calvinism is theocentric theology that calls for devotion to God with the outflow of doxology. Such a theology is grounded in the authority of the sufficient Scriptures and is practiced by the enablement of the Holy Spirit. Of course, much more could be said, but for the purpose of this post I will dwell on the features of the word of God and the work of the Holy Spirit.

The consistent Calvinist stands on the authority of Scripture. This is driven by the conviction that the word of God is the authoritative, infallible and sufficient rule for all matters pertaining to life and godliness (). With this comes the belief that the “former ways of God’s revealing his will unto his people being now ceased.”[2] The Calvinist has a high view of Scripture. Since the word of God is authoritative, infallible and sufficient, why do I need to appeal to experience? The Calvinistic approach to Scripture views God’s word as complete and nothing is needed in addition to it which claims divine authority. A battle cry of the reformation was Sola Scriptura. This is the recognition that the Scriptures alone are the supreme authority for matters of salvation and sanctification (cf. ). To claim divine authority outside of the Scripture by means of visions, experiences or leading is wrong. The word of God alone can be appealed to as Divine authority.

Furthermore, the Calvinist is completely dependent on the power of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit – in accordance with God’s sovereign decree – brings regeneration to the soul (; ) and enables the believer in all matters for Christian living (). Calvinistic writers over the years have written much on the work of the Spirit as revealed in God’s word. For an example, consider these classics John Owen (Discourse on the Holy Spirit 1674 or The Works of John Owen, Volume 3: The Holy Spirit) and Abraham Kuyper (Work of the Holy Spirit).

The Calvinist does not need to be charismatic. Why? Because he has a high view of Scripture that provides the sufficiency for Christian living and he recognises that this is what God has ordained. Further, the Calvinist understands the sovereign power of the Holy Spirit and desires to honour the Lord through the Spirt’s enabling. In my next post I would like to show why I believe that to be charismatic is to be inconsistent with Calvinism – the discontinuity of the continuationist (the belief that the miraculous gifts are still in operation today).

 


[1] Burk Parson (Edited), John Calvin: A Heart for Devotion, Doctrine and Doxology, Reformation Trust Publishing, 2008, p. 3

[2] Westminster Confession of Faith (1646) and London Confession of Faith (1689), 1:1

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His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence,

16 All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, 17 that the man of God may be competent, equipped for every good work.

Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit.

he saved us, not because of works done by us in righteousness, but according to his own mercy, by the washing of regeneration and renewal of the Holy Spirit,

18 And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit,

Published by

Andrew Courtis

Andrew Courtis

ANDREW - Serves as Pastor of Hills Bible Church. I am married to Dianne and we have three children (Kate, Emma and Jack). I was born and raised in Melbourne, moved to Adelaide to undertake theological studies (BMin.), and have completed additional studies with the Australian College of Theology (MATh.). I have served in pastoral ministry in both Melbourne and Sydney and am a qualified school teacher. I am committed to expository preaching and making the word of God known and understood.

5 thoughts on “Calvinistic and Charismatic – Do they Mix?”

  1. Thanks Andrew for your article.

    I was thinking that the same could be said by the Charasmatic:

    ‘The Charismatic does not need to be Calvinist. Why? Because he has a high view of Scripture that provides the sufficiency for Christian living and he recognises that this is what God has ordained. Further, the Charismatic understands the sovereign power of the Holy Spirit and desires to honour the Lord through the Spirit’s enabling. ‘

    Certainly, while every believer receives the Holy Spirit, it seems correct to me that the Charismatics, claim a greater filling or enabling or continual filling. They are not ‘more saved’ or ‘more special’ they have simply daily received the ‘Comforter’ as He was promised and allow Him to work in any gift He wishes to.

    There seems to be one great problem for the Cessationists in – ‘….For we know in part and we prophesy in part, 10 but when completeness comes, what is in part disappears….’

    We know that ‘completeness’ or ‘perfection’ has not yet come, that is yet to come, so until then, the continual filling of the Holy Spirit and His gifts are available to aid the church and every believer.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

    Keep up the good work Andrew.

    1. Thanks for your gracious comment Neil. This is a big topic that leads to many other questions.

      In reply to your statement: “The Charismatic does not need to be Calvinist. Why? Because he has a high view of Scripture that provides the sufficiency for Christian living and he recognises that this is what God has ordained.” I personally know of many charismatics who have a high view of Scripture. However, the sufficiency for Christian living in their theology doesn’t come exclusively from Scripture in practice. It comes from additional revelation (whether it is fallible or infallible).

      You also said, “that the Charismatics, claim a greater filling or enabling or continual filling.” For some (but not all), this claim is made. I think such a claim is the result of a wrong understanding of “filling” and “enabling”. Shortly, I will be doing a post on what it means to be filled with the Spirit.

      Neil, thanks so much for visiting and taking the time to leave a comment.

  2. Greetings and best wishes to you from Gulfport, Mississippi. The argument which you present, though typical and enriched with truths, seldom addresses . In communal prayer the Lord is asked, often tearfully, if He “desires,” to heal a beloved one. Healing(Divine) it seems takes on a revised definition. May God’s glory be lifted on high.

    1. Hi Phillip. Wow, a comment from Mississippi! I appreciate your comment. The topic of healing is something that I would like to address in a future post. In a sentence, I believe in Divine healing. However, I don’t believe anyone today carries with them the spiritual gift of healing.

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