The Power of the Cross

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In the first century, crucifixion was a means used to execute criminals. The four gospel accounts provide record of the events that led up to and the actual occasion of the crucifixion of Christ. Treated and tried as a criminal, Jesus Christ was innocent of the earthly charges made concerning Him.  However, it was necessary that He be crucified. We are told that it was at the cross  where Jesus Christ made the atonement for sin. It is for this reason that the word of the cross for us who believe “is the power of God” (). The cross of Christ provides us with a powerful message. It is a pulpit in which the most amazing message is proclaimed. It was Augustine who said, “The cross was a pulpit in which Christ preached his love to the world”. How was this love preached? In Paul’s letter to the Romans we read concerning Christ,

“whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins. It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus” ().

In these two verses the message of the cross is heard in two declarations:

The Cross Declared Divine Justice
God is righteous and just. Moses said concerning the Lord, “The Rock, his work is perfect, for all his ways are justice. A God of faithfulness and without iniquity, just and upright is he” (). Because this is who God is, everything He does is in accordance with what is right and just. This includes how He treats us. When we compare ourselves against God’s righteous standard it becomes crystal clear that we are sinful (cf. ). This means if God is going to be just, He must punish our sins.

How did the cross declare Divine justice? In God’s great mercy He provided a way in which His wrath would be satisfied. begins by saying what God the Father did concerning the Lord Jesus Christ, “whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood“. The word “propitiation” refers to the act of satisfying God’s wrath against sin. God’s wrath is justifiably towards all sinners and as we sin we are storing up more wrath against us (cf. ). How can this wrath ever be taken away? The solution is found in the cross. As stated earlier, in God’s great mercy He provided a way in which His wrath would be satisfied. The act of satisfying His wrath came when He “put forward” His own Son “as a propitiation”.

At the cross, the Lord Jesus Christ took our place by being “put forward” publically. This means, when He was crucified it was not done in secret, but God put His Son on public display at Calvary for all to see. According to , “For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God“. At the cross Christ became sin on our behalf. We deserve to be punished; we deserved God’s fury to be unleashed on us. But those who come to God through faith in Christ Jesus had their sins imputed to Christ. He took your punishment, and God treated Him on that cross as if that was you. How amazing and humbling is that truth!

Simply put, when Jesus died on the cross He satisfied the Father’s anger and wrath towards sin. This act of sacrifice involved a cost and that was the very blood of Jesus Christ (cf. ).

The Cross Declared Divine Justification
Christ satisfied the wrath of God at the cross. However, if you are going to have a right standing before God, you must have faith in the Lord Jesus Christ alone. Paul writes that this gift comes to “the one who has faith in Jesus” (). Faith is coming to God on the grounds of grace, understanding that we deserve to be punished by God for our sin. Therefore, having nothing to offer we trust and adhere to Jesus Christ as Lord, and by faith we place our full confidence and trust in Him. The words from the hymn “My hope is built on nothing less” convey the grand truth in this text,

“My hope is built on nothing less
 than Jesus’ blood and righteousness. 
I dare not trust the sweetest frame,
 but wholly trust in Jesus’ Name.”

The power of the cross is seen in that God was both just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus. Justice and love met at the cross thus forming the sound of the greatest message to ever be heard. The cross is indeed the pulpit of God’s love – this is the power of the cross.

18 For the word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.

25 whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins. 26 It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus.

“The Rock, his work is perfect,
for all his ways are justice.
A God of faithfulness and without iniquity,
just and upright is he.

23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,

25 whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins.

18 For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth.

Romans 2:5

But because of your hard and impenitent heart you are storing up wrath for yourself on the day of wrath when God’s righteous judgment will be revealed.

21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

18 knowing that you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your forefathers, not with perishable things such as silver or gold, 19 but with the precious blood of Christ, like that of a lamb without blemish or spot.

26 It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus.

The Great Exchange: My Sin for His Righteousness

The Great Exchange

“My hope is built on nothing less
Than Jesus’ blood and righteousness.
I dare not trust the sweetest frame,
But wholly trust in Jesus’ Name”

The doctrine of substitutionary atonement continues to undergo criticism and redefinition. Many are buying into a watered down interpretation of this doctrine, while others simply ignore this valuable doctrine and emphasise “user-friendly” doctrines. Is this even an important issue? Does there need to be  entire books discussing the issue of the atonement? It is the argument of the authors of The Great Exchange that the doctrine of the substitutionary atonement of Jesus Christ is the centre of the gospel. Therefore, it is of paramount importance.  This book was written back in 2007, but it continues to be an important and valuable book on this topic.

Continue reading The Great Exchange: My Sin for His Righteousness

Jesus’ Wounds, His Resurrection Body, and Our’s

 

Picture Credit: L O O K, Creative Commons

A question that is occasionally discussed late at night around the campfire, or pizza boxes, is “Why did Jesus have wounds on his resurrection body?” Such a question will never be finally answered until the Second Advent, but I hope I am not straying off the straight-and-narrow with a bit of theological speculation on this subject.

Paul says that Jesus resurrection body was spiritual (), heavenly (), and imperishable (). Likewise, his body was very physical (, ). When Jesus appeared to his disciples in the days following his resurrection from the dead, he bore some of the marks of his execution on a cross (, ). What might this mean? And what might it mean for us? After all, we will receive resurrection bodies in the same way that Jesus did (, , ).

Here begins the speculation, because the Bible doesn’t really say what it means. I don’t think Jesus Continue reading Jesus’ Wounds, His Resurrection Body, and Our’s

44 It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body.

47 The first man was from the earth, a man of dust; the second man is from heaven.

50 I tell you this, brothers: flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, nor does the perishable inherit the imperishable.

24 Now Thomas, one of the Twelve, called the Twin, was not with them when Jesus came. 25 So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see in his hands the mark of the nails, and place my finger into the mark of the nails, and place my hand into his side, I will never believe.”

26 Eight days later, his disciples were inside again, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were locked, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” 27 Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and see my hands; and put out your hand, and place it in my side. Do not disbelieve, but believe.”

42 They gave him a piece of broiled fish,

38 And he said to them, “Why are you troubled, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? 39 See my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me, and see. For a spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have.”

24 Now Thomas, one of the Twelve, called the Twin, was not with them when Jesus came. 25 So the other disciples told him, “We have seen the Lord.” But he said to them, “Unless I see in his hands the mark of the nails, and place my finger into the mark of the nails, and place my hand into his side, I will never believe.”

26 Eight days later, his disciples were inside again, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were locked, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” 27 Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and see my hands; and put out your hand, and place it in my side. Do not disbelieve, but believe.”

21 who will transform our lowly body to be like his glorious body, by the power that enables him even to subject all things to himself.

49 Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven.

51 Behold! I tell you a mystery. We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, 52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed. 53 For this perishable body must put on the imperishable, and this mortal body must put on immortality.

Spurgeon

For many, of whom I have often told you and now tell you even with tears, walk as enemies of the cross of Christ. Their end is destruction, their god is their belly, and they glory in their shame, with minds set on earthly things.”

On The Cross

First, let us enquire, WHAT IS THIS CROSS OF CHRIST to which some men are sadly said to be enemies?

Of course, it is not the material cross. It is not anything made in the shape of the cross. There are some who can fall down and adore a cross of wood, or stone, or gold, but I cannot conceive of a greater wounding of the heart of Christ than to pay reverence to anything in the shape of Continue reading Spurgeon

18 For many, of whom I have often told you and now tell you even with tears, walk as enemies of the cross of Christ. 19 Their end is destruction, their god is their belly, and they glory in their shame, with minds set on earthly things.