The Messiah in the Manger

Manger

The birth of Jesus was an extraordinary birth. It came as the result of the sovereign plan of God. This sovereign plan was determined before the foundation of world and in time was revealed in the Scriptures. It is for this reason the entrance of Jesus Christ into the world was not random or reactionary. He entered into the world in precise fulfillment to prophecy. Over the course of His life, He fulfilled around 100 ancient prophecies. Here are just a few: Continue reading The Messiah in the Manger

The Discontinuity of the Calvinistic Continuationist

pentecost

As I said in my previous post, I have great respect and admiration for many Calvinistic Continuationists. My posts do not call into question the benefit some of these individuals are to the church, nor do I call into question their personal piety and godly example. My aim is to respond to the claim the Calvinists ought to be charismatic. I disagree with such a claim.

What is a continuationist? The continuationist believes that the miraculous gifts are still in operation in the church today. I must say, that I agree with Phil Johnson as he has observed that “it’s pretty hard to find a real continuationist.”[1] What he means by this is that an evangelical continuationist is a cessationist at some level. With the exception of extreme continuationists, they don’t think there are apostles around today who write Scripture. It is taught that this gift is no longer in operation. In this sense, there are not many true continuationists around. Continuationists believe some of the gifts have ceased or carry a different function from apostolic age.

In my view, the Charismatic Calvinist has gone beyond the sufficiency of Scripture by claiming there are ongoing revelations today that undermine the Calvinistic high view of Scripture and the sovereign work of the Holy Spirit. It is not within the scope of this post to discuss why I believe the gifts of apostleship, prophecy, tongues, healing and miracles are no longer operative today. However, by way of a brief comment I would say that the actual aforementioned spiritual gifts were real and beneficial, but they were foundational and confirmatory of the apostolic age. Continue reading The Discontinuity of the Calvinistic Continuationist

Oliphint on “getting a word from God”

Hearing from God

Picture credit: Some rights reserved by epiclectic

Back in September, K. Scott Oliphint penned an article over at Reformation 21 on the tension between the concept of “getting a word from God“, and the Reformed and Evangelical doctrine of Scripture. I only read it quite recently, but found it tremendously helpful. I’ve been wrestling with this issue for a number of years, and have found a lot of helpful material on both sides of the argument. The reason I point to this article in particular is that it articulates something which others never quite managed to. And it made me go “Ah ha!” Here’s an excerpt: Continue reading Oliphint on “getting a word from God”

The Spirit of Prophecy


says:

“Then I fell down at his feet to worship him, but he said to me, “You must not do that! I am a fellow servant with you and your brothers who hold to the testimony of Jesus. Worship God.” For the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy.

When John falls at the feet of the angel, he rebukes John, telling him to worship God alone.  God has spoken through the angel, but God also speaks through John and other Christians.  The angel is merely a “fellow servant” with John and his fellow Christians who hold to the testimony of Jesus.  This is “the spirit of prophecy”.  That is, John and all Christians who bear testimony to Jesus are also proclaiming the word of God, just like the angel.  Testimony to Jesus is the spirit of prophecy. Continue reading The Spirit of Prophecy

10 Then I fell down at his feet to worship him, but he said to me, “You must not do that! I am a fellow servant with you and your brothers who hold to the testimony of Jesus. Worship God.” For the testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy.