Together for the Gospel 2016

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On 12-14 April, around 10,000 gathered for the 2016 Together for the Gospel (T4G) conference in Louisville, Kentucky. This year the theme was We Are Protestant. This was in celebration for the up and coming 500 anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. Below are links to the videos of the main sessions, voices from the past, a celebration video and two of the panels. For more information, please take time to visit the T4G website. Continue reading Together for the Gospel 2016

The Five Solas

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On October 31, 1517 Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses (written in Latin) to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg. This historical event was not the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, but was a means that started discussions and debates about the abuses of the Roman Catholic Church’s indulgences. After a series of events, Luther’s discussion intensified to a declaration of a defence of the gospel.

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Book Review: “William Tyndale” by Brian Moynahan


William Tyndale: If God Spare My Life
, by Brian Moynahan, Abacus, 2003.

William Tyndale was a pioneering Bible translator, whose work on the English Bible indirectly became 84 percent of the King James Version. Tyndale was converted to Lutheranism after studying at Cambridge – in fact he arrived at Cambridge one year before Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the Wittenberg castle church door. His conversion to what was commonly known as the “evangelical” faith led him to leave England in order to translate the Word of God into English, from the original languages.

Once he left England, his work became infamous, and Tyndale himself became a wanted fugitive. The story of his life is one of hiding, working under cover of disguise and intrigue, and releasing his work into England from the Continent. His writings included direct attacks on the papacy, the clergy, commentaries, and treatises on King Henry VIII’s marriage issues. His greatest work was his Continue reading Book Review: “William Tyndale” by Brian Moynahan